Beiträge

Interview mit Lucio Mollica, Regisseur von „Krieg vor Gericht“

Emma Neuber, Estella Müller & Miriam Schirmer

In der zweiteiligen Dokumentarfilmreihe „Krieg vor Gericht“ gibt Regisseur Lucio Mollica einen detaillierten Einblick in die juristische Aufarbeitung der während der Jugoslawienkriege von 1991 bis 2001 verübten Massenverbrechen. Dabei werden einerseits historische Ereignisse rund um das Jugoslawientribunal detailgenau rekonstruiert. Andererseits geben Berichte von Zeitzeug:innen einen persönlichen Einblick in die geschehenen Massenverbrechen und den Strafprozess.

Dieses englischsprachige Interview ist Teil einer Interviewreihe und Filmbesprechung von Genocide Alert e.V. anlässlich der Veröffentlichung. Die zweiteilige Dokumentarreihe „Krieg vor Gericht“ ist noch bis zum 08.08.2021 in der ARD-Mediathek online zu sehen.

The Interview

This interview with the Italian director Lucio Mollica was conducted in connection with the documentary series “Krieg vor Gericht – Die Jugoslawien-Prozesse“.

GA: The first question is a rather personal one: We are interested in your motivation to produce this movie – why did you decide to engage yourself with the topic of the ICTY?

LM: It’s a long story. Part of it is because of the first film I made. Just after school, I went with a group of friends to Bosnia to make a film ten years after the end of the war, and we remained so attached to this country. We were supposed to stay there only a few weeks, but we ended up staying longer and we were really heartbroken when we finally left. Somehow, I remained connected to this country, to its people and I continued following essentially what the ICTY was doing as a matter of personal interest. The last film I did was a series about Afghanistan and its history of the past 40 years. And one of the things I found most striking about the history of Afghanistan – and probably one of the causes of this never-ending cycle of violence in that country – is the absolute lack of justice and of truth at the same time, of a recognized truth and a feeling of those guilty having been somehow put on trial and sentenced. And that’s why it was important to look at the spirits of the ICTY, which is now somehow a bit distant from us.

GA: You said that you already shot a movie on the Bosnian War and the former Yugoslavia and that you stayed connected somehow. What made you stay connected specifically?

LM: I think first of all because of the people that I’ve met and the stories they shared with us. They were so shocking and at the same time so true, so strong. And you know, I’m an Italian; Italy is a border nation of the former Yugoslavia. When I grew up as a kid, the war was taking place, so it was very close to us. We used to go there and they also travelled to Italy, there were many similarities in a number of regards. I think the experience of how quickly a nation can descend into war, into violence, is something I did not forget and that’s one of the aspects of this film. I didn’t want to focus too much on the particularities on how the situation in Yugoslavia evolved. Instead, I almost wanted to work by subtraction and see how in the end the pattern could happen and how it could start tomorrow in any other country.  History repeats itself and we learn so little from it, so a documentary may help sometimes.

GA: Of course, you already knew a little bit about the background and the history, but how was research conducted in general for the film?

LM: We had a good team, that was the most important aspect. We had journalists who were familiar with the region or were from the region. Additionally, historians and a lot of other people with different expertise advised us on different levels. The most extensive research we did was the research in the tribunal’s archive and in the archive of the war. Especially the research on the tribunal was very extensive because we were dealing with thousands, maybe millions of hours of material. It took us at least a month to decide how we were starting, how we were looking at it. I think that was the most challenging part in this film or one of the challenges.

GA: You said that the research was the most challenging part. Was it also challenging to find protagonists and survivors, or the other participants in the tribunal?

LM: No, I would say that was quite straightforward. It was challenging to decide who was going to make it into the film. In twenty years of history and trial of the tribunal, there was no shortage of judges, prosecutors, survivors, and witnesses. It was a bit more difficult with perpetrators, that was definitively the most challenging operation for us in terms of who to feature in the documentary. But in general, also thanks to the historians we worked with and who in their previous work had been in contact with some of the protagonists, it was relatively easy to get in touch with people. If you come back to them humanely, there is a good chance that the interview is going to be good as well.

GA: You already mentioned that it was important for you to have different perspectives. Also, were there aspects of the film where it was more important for you to include different perspectives?

LM: One of the most interesting books I’ve read on the subject a long time ago was the book of Slavenka Drakulić, a Croation writer and one of the characters in the film. She wrote a book about some perpetrators in the tribunal, which is named “They Would Never Hurt a Fly“. I would have made a film just on that for how interesting it is to understand how perfectly ordinary people in the wrong circumstances became capable of atrocities and mass murders. Again, assuming that this could happen elsewhere, I think it is important to understand this. So that we don’t say, it’s them, it’s these bad people, it’s this culture, this country that produced these atrocities. But it’s  normal people, who in other circumstances could have been artists, gardeners, or doctors. In the end, for me, it was important to give a testimony. Of course, it implies questions, because I’m sure not everybody is happy when you give a stage to somebody with that kind of background. But I think it’s worth doing. The choice of the perpetrators that we had was more interesting, because it required some sensibility. We didn’t want to have any perpetrators.  We were quite sure in particular that we didn’t want to offer anybody a platform just to rerun the trial. We were interested in the human journey inside the institution of the ICTY. And so, we chose two people who were very different. One was Serb, one was Bosnian. One was a big political actor, the other one was an ordinary foot soldier.[1] But both of them expressed their culpability, each in a different way. And it was interesting for us to see how different reasons brought on the admission of guilt.

GA: Did you, when you shot the movie and when you interviewed the different people, have them on set simultaneously? Were there any tensions?

LM: No, never. Everyone was filmed separately because we like to give people our undivided attention in the time they spend with us. We interviewed them for a day, sometimes more than one day. The time we spent together served to create trust and intimacy; everybody needed to feel unique in that moment. They are recounting their own individual personal stories and that can be very traumatic, sometimes very difficult, so we didn’t want to mix those emotional processes with something else.

GA: Did you tell the survivors in advance that you were also conducting interviews with perpetrators? And what did they say about that?

LM: I remember with one of them there was a conversation about how it’s not important if you feature the survivors, the perpetrators, but how much space you give them. Because there is a fair amount of denialism, for instance, regarding Srebrenica. And I made it very clear that that’s not what we were interested to have in the film. We didn’t want a debate on whether Srebrenica happened or not, or who was right and who was wrong in the war. It was a film about justice. And in justice, the defendants – including the guilty ones – have the right to speak. This is why I think it was right to include their perspectives as well.

GA: And how was it for you personally to work with or interview the survivors? Did you have any psychologists on set as well?

LM: No, we didn’t have a psychologist on set. It’s not like a medical first aid kit. Because often, the psychological impact such an interview can have is a process. And this process takes time. The characters that opened up to me were fine on set, but I’m sure that reliving the story is painful and opens some wounds every single time. So probably after the interview, I can imagine for some of them, they didn’t feel great.

GA: I think that’s a very interesting point that you mentioned. Of course, you can break open existing wounds and you always have a risk of re-traumatization, but on the other hand, you’re curious; you want to tell the public more about the fate of the individuals. How do you manage this tension between the risk of re-traumatization on the one hand and the public interest on the other hand?

LM: I think it’s a bit arrogant from my perspective as a filmmaker to judge. I think it’s very much in the responsibility of my interview partner. I like to do some preparatory work with them to explore the different aspects of the interview and the process. I want to give them the possibility to think about it in the cold light of the day and to be prepared for it. In most cases, they know exactly what they are going to face. Mostly, they have done interviews before, so they have been there already. Every time it’s painful and difficult, but they know it. I think it would be difficult if we were dealing with other characters, with children, with people who are less informed about how the media and this process works. But in this case, I think they were in the position to make their own choices. Of course, you try to go step by step with them, not to force them and to leave them space, in which they feel free to stop when they want to stop or to interrupt. But every time it’s a learning experience for me as well.

GA: What was the most memorable moment talking to survivors for you personally?

LM: There were many. I remember, for instance, Esad Landžo [one of the convicted perpetrators interviewed in the series], when he was watching the images of the trial that he probably hadn’t watched since the trial. It was a very intense moment. Or when we walked with Nedžad Avdić [survivor of the massacre of Srebrenica interviewed in the series] in the woods of Srebrenica where he had lost his father and started his journey. And he had also never come back before. It really does something you. But my interest was also in the staff of the tribunal. For instance, Jean-René Ruez, the policeman. In his office he has all the documents he collected for those years, lots of memorabilia, notes. It makes you feel how strong of an impact the tribunal left but also how passionate people can really move mountains. In the end, if it wasn’t for individuals who took their job very seriously, the ICTY could have never happened the way it did. I am talking about Ruez as an example, but it’s true for a number of people who worked for the ICTY on different levels. In highly unlikely circumstances they accomplished something that was unexpected. This shows that people can make a difference and that was a big lesson of the documentary.

Das Ermittlerteam des ICTY bei Ausgrabungen vor Ort (Copyright siehe unten).
Bild: Das Ermittlerteam des ICTY bei Ausgrabungen vor Ort (Copyright siehe unten).

GA: You mentioned earlier that it’s a documentary series about justice: How do you think your series can help foster the discussion about justice after mass atrocities or after genocide in the future?

LM: It’s simple: Documentaries can start a discussion simply by being watched and commented. Online there are a lot of comments and discussions about the film and people of different, sometimes opposing ideas debate over it. Maybe the people watching develop some thoughts or discover something they didn’t know. It’s easy to dismiss or to forget what this trial has been about. So just to keep that memory alive was important to us. And then, trying to learn something from it, would be the second step.

GA: Just for you personally, as a conclusion, what’s the most important aspect for you about the film? Or what is closest to your heart about this movie?

LM: Again, we come back to the beginning: Such atrocities can happen again, and they can happen elsewhere. The second part is that we need some kind of justice, because it’s going to happen again. The lack of justice actually perpetrates the risk of escalating violence. We need to find a way as a civilization to deal with these crimes in a just manner. It’s not just about punishing the guilty, but it’s about bringing justice. No matter the criticism that was put against the ICTY – which I’m not going to challenge – every one of these 161 people indicted in the tribunal had the possibility to defend themselves, to call witnesses, to have a lawyer, sometimes a team of lawyers, to challenge every single piece of evidence or every single witness of the prosecution. Some were acquitted. I think this might not be received well by all sides, but I think in the long run it pays off.

[1] The convicted perpetrators interviewed in the documentary were Esad Landžo, the Bosnian foot soldier mentioned, and Biljana Plavšić, former president of the Republic of Srbska.


Bildrechte

Titelbild:
Privataufnahme, bereitgestellt durch Lucio Mollica.

Beitragsbild:
RUNDFUNK BERLIN-BRANDENBURG
Krieg vor Gericht – Die Jugoslawien-Prozesse
Das Grauen des Balkankrieges: belagerte Städte, vertriebene Familien, über 130.000 Tote. Der Internationalen Strafgerichtshof für das ehemalige Jugoslawien sollte die Kriegsverbrechen ahnden. Nie zuvor hat ein internationales Gericht Kriegsverbrecher aller Seiten verfolgt – darunter Mladić, Karadžić und Milošević. Der Film erzählt von Opfern, Tätern und Anklägern. – Der ehemalige bosnisch-serbische Politiker Radovan Karadžić vor Gericht am 24. März 2016 in Den Haag.

© rbb/Jean-René Ruez, honorarfrei – Verwendung gemäß der AGB im engen inhaltlichen, redaktionellen Zusammenhang mit genannter rbb-Sendung bei Nennung „Bild: rbb/Jean-René Ruez“ (S2+). rbb Presse & Information, Masurenallee 8-14, 14057 Berlin, Tel: 030/97 99 3-12118, pressefoto@rbb-online.de

25 Jahre Srebrenica: Damaliges Versagen der UN ist bis heute eine Mahnung

Die bosnische Stadt Srebrenica ist bis heute ein Mahnmal des Scheiterns der Vereinten Nationen und der internationalen Gemeinschaft im Angesicht eines Völkermordes. Im Juli 1995 ermordeten dort bosnisch-serbische Truppen mehr als 8.000 muslimische Bosniaken. Es ist das schwerste Kriegsverbrechen auf europäischem Boden seit Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs. Die in Srebrenica stationierten UN-Blauhelmsoldaten hatten den bosnisch-serbischen Truppen nichts entgegenzusetzen, die unter der Führung von Ratko Mladić im Juli 1995 in die Stadt einmarschierten. Zwar wurden die damaligen Geschehnisse international juristisch und politisch aufgearbeitet. Die Erinnerung an Srebrenica muss aber weiter als Mahnung verstanden werden: Auch heute noch kommt es zu ethnisch motivierter Gewalt sowie einseitiger Gewalt gegen Zivilistinnen und Zivilisten. Trotz aller politischen Bekenntnisse könnten sich Grausamkeiten wie 1995 in Srebrenica auch heute noch wiederholen. Wir müssen uns fragen: Sollten unsere Regierungen und die UN sich nicht intensiver und früher engagieren, um Menschen zu schützen?  

Die Probleme der UN-Mission UNPROFOR in Bosnien-Herzegowina 

In Folge der Unabhängigkeitserklärung Bosnien-Herzegowinas vom Vielvölkerstaat Jugoslawien im Februar 1992 brach ein Bürgerkrieg aus, mit christlichen bosnischen Serben und muslimischen Bosniaken als Hauptkonfliktparteien. Angesichts der eskalierenden Gewalt beauftragte der UNSicherheitsrat im Juni 1992 zunächst die vor Ort stationierte UN-Mission UNPROFOR damit, bei der Bereitstellung humanitärer Hilfe zu leisten. Er erteilte aber nicht das Mandat, Gewalt zum Schutz von Zivilisten anzuwenden. Dies ergänzte er ab Oktober 1992 durch eine von der NATO durchgesetzte Flugverbotszone über Bosnien-Herzegowina. Diese änderte jedoch wenig an der Lage. Die Kämpfe und Übergriffe eskalierten weiter.  

Im April und Mai 1993 verlangte der UNSicherheitsrat schließlich die Schaffung „sicherer Zonen” (safe areas“) um die bosnischen Städte Srebrenica, Sarajevo, Gorazde, Zepa, Tuzla und Bihac, die von serbischen Truppen belagert wurden. Im Juni 1993 beschloss er unter Kapitel VII der Charta der Vereinten Nationen eine weitere Erweiterung des Mandats der UNPROFOR. Die Mission sollte so in die Lage versetzt werden, Angriffe auf diese in Deutschland meist als Schutzzonen bezeichneten Gebiete zu verhindern und einen Rückzug bosnisch-serbischer Einheiten zu überwachen.  

Hierbei sahen sich die Blauhelme jedoch mit einem grundlegenden Problem konfrontiert. Die Rahmenbedingungen des Mandats basierten auf den klassischen Prinzipien des UN-Peacekeeping: Zustimmung der Konfliktparteien, Unparteilichkeit und minimaler Gewalteinsatz zur Selbstverteidigung. Die Aufgaben der UNPROFOR Mission, einschließlich der Absicherung humanitärer Hilfe und der Abschreckung von Angriffen auf die errichteten Schutzzonen, gingen jedoch weit über das hinaus, was die üblicherweise nur leicht bewaffneten Blauhelmsoldaten mit ihrer kleinen Truppenstärke leisten konnten.  

Statt der eigentlich von UN-Generalsekretär Boutros Boutros-Ghali für die Sicherung der Schutzzonen geforderten 34.000 UN-Soldaten bewilligte der UN-Sicherheitsrat lediglich 7.600 zusätzliche Soldatinnen und Soldaten. Zudem war unklar, inwiefern sie überhaupt Gewalt einsetzen durften, um das Mandat zu erfüllen. Gleichzeitig konnten sich die Vereinten Nationen und die NATO lange nicht auf den Umfang des Mandats der NATO in der Verteidigung der Flugverbotszone sowie der Erlaubnis für Luftangriffe auf bosnisch-serbische Truppen einigen.  

Nachdem die NATO ab 1994 begann vereinzelt bosnisch-serbische Truppen am Boden zu bombardieren, um deren Rückzug aus vereinbarten Schutzzonen zu erzwingen, zeigte sich die Verwundbarkeit der UN-Truppen deutlich. Immer wieder nahmen bosnisch-serbische Truppen UN-Mitarbeiterinnen und -Mitarbeiter sowie Blauhelme als Geiseln, um Luftangriffe der NATO abzuschrecken.  

Die Eroberung Srebrenicas und die Ermordung von mehr als 8.000 Menschen 

Srebrenica lag damals inmitten serbisch kontrollierter Gebiete und wurde jahrelang belagert. Die serbische Seite erkannte eine Zugehörigkeit von Srebrenica und anderen Schutzzonen zum bosniakischen Gebiet nicht an.  

Der Präsident der bosnisch-serbischen Republika Srpska, Radovan Karadžić, befahl im März 1995, in der Schutzzone Srebrenica und in anderen Schutzzonen gezielt Unsicherheit durch Militäroperationen zu schaffen. Die Eingeschlossenen sollten die Hoffnung auf einen Ausweg verlieren. Im Sommer 1995 begannen die bosnisch-serbischen Truppen dann die sicheren Zonen anzugreifen. Die unerfahrenen und unzureichend ausgerüsteten UNPROFOR-Blauhelme standen zahlenmäßig überlegenen, entschlossenen serbischen Truppen gegenüber, die die Schutzzonen erobern wollten.  

Ab dem 6. Juli rückten die bosnisch- serbischen Truppen unter der Führung von General Mladić auf die Schutzzone um Srebrenica vor und griffen Posten der UNPROFOR an. Blauhelm-Kommandeur Thomas Karremans forderte mehrfach Luftunterstützung im UNPROFOR-Hauptquartier an. Dort war man jedoch überzeugt, Mladić wolle lediglich strategisch wichtige Positionen erobern und nicht Srebrenica an sich angreifen. Zudem fürchteten UN und NATO um das Leben niederländischer Blauhelmsoldaten, die zuvor als Geiseln genommenen worden waren. Hinzu kamen Befürchtungen, dass ein zu entschiedenes Vorgehen gegen die bosnischen Serben die Konfliktlösung für ganz Jugoslawien erschweren könnte. Weitere Kontrollposten der Blauhelme vor Ort wurden überrannt. Als die bosnisch-serbischen Truppen erkannten, dass die UNPROFOR-Truppen nicht in der Lage oder nicht willens waren ihren Vormarsch zu stoppen, rückten sie endgültig auf Srebrenica vor.  

Ratko Mladić und seine Truppen marschierten schließlich am 11. Juli in Srebrenica ein. Rund 20.000 Menschen suchten indessen im Verlauf des Vormarsches Schutz im UN-Truppenhauptquartier in Potočari, einem Vorort von Srebrenica. Die meisten davon Frauen und Kinder, jedoch auch rund 300 Männer. Die rund 400 niederländischen Soldaten vor Ort konnten jedoch nichts unternehmen, um die Menschen zu verteidigen. Ein Fluchtversuch einer Kolonne von rund 10.000 Menschen scheiterte. Als Mladic auch in Potočari einrückte, stimmten die Blauhelme aus Angst vor den Angreifern seinen Forderungen zu.   

Erst am 12 Juli 1995 verurteilte der UNSicherheitsrat den Angriff auf Srebrenica und forderte Mladić zum Rückzug auf. Die Resolution blieb aber wirkungslos. Mladić Truppen begannen damit, die Bevölkerung zu selektieren: Frauen und Kinder wurden in Bussen abtransportiert und in die Nähe muslimisch-kontrollierter Gebiete gebracht. Männer und Jungen im wehrfähigen Alter wurden gefangen genommen, in die umliegenden Wälder gebracht und in den folgenden Tagen dort erschossen. Ihre Leichen wurden in Massengräbern verscharrt. Später wurden die Gräber wieder geöffnet und die Leichen auf weitere Gräber verteilt, um den Massenmord zu vertuschen.  

Innerhalb weniger Tage wurden somit über 8.000 Bosniaken, meist Jungen und Männer, ermordet. 

Internationale Aufarbeitung und Lehren aus Srebrenica  

Das Internationale Kriegsverbrechertribunal für das ehemalige Jugoslawien (ICTY) arbeitete die Geschehnisse später umfassend auf und stufte die Geschehnisse als Völkermord ein. Insgesamt wurden bislang 15 Offiziere und Offizielle der bosnischen Serben für ihre Beteiligung am Massaker von Srebrenica verurteilt. Der Anführer der bosnischen Serben Radovan Karadžić und auch der damalige General Ratko Mladić wurden als Hauptverantwortliche für den Völkermord zu lebenslanger Haft verurteilt. Auch Slobodan Milošević, der damalige Präsident Serbiens, war vor dem ICTY wegen einer Mitverantwortung am Massaker in Srebrenica angeklagt. Er starb jedoch 2006 noch vor Abschluss des Verfahrens. 

Auch in den Niederlanden wurden die Ereignisse umfassend aufgearbeitet. Eine von der Regierung eingesetzte Kommission kam in ihrem Abschlussbericht 2002 zu dem Urteil, dass die niederländischen Blauhelme in Srebrenica in eine aussichtslose Mission geschickt worden seien. Später strebten Hinterbliebene der Opfer, organisiert im Verein „Mütter von Srebrenica“ eine Zivilklage gegen den niederländischen Staat an. Ihr Vorwurf: Die Blauhelmsoldaten hätten nicht genug getan, um die Männer vor Ort vor den Truppen von Mladić zu schützen. Nach mehreren Instanzen erging hierzu 2019 das finale Urteil: Die UNBlauhelmsoldaten hätten zwar kaum eine Chance auf Erfolg gehabt, sie hätten aber mehr tun müssen, um die 300 Männer im Blauhelmquartier in Potočari zu schützen. Die Niederlande müsse den Angehörigen daher eine Entschädigung zahlen. 

Die Erfahrungen der UN-Missionen in Bosnien sowie Somalia und Ruanda führten zu einem Umdenken im UNSicherheitsrat. Ein Anfang der 1990er Jahre existenter Glaube an die Möglichkeiten des UN-Peacekeeping wich einer Ernüchterung über die Erfolgsaussichten in Situationen, in denen es gar keinen Frieden zu schützen gibt. Es wurde deutlich, dass unangemessene und vage Mandate, die etwa nur leichte Bewaffnung vorsehen, unklare Einsatzvorgaben und Zielsetzungen und unzureichende materielle und personelle Ressourcen das schlechteste aller Szenarien für die Blauhelme bedeuteten.  

Hinzu kam, auch im Falle Srebrenica, ein fehlender politischer Wille im Sicherheitsrat robustere Maßnahmen zu autorisieren sowie organisatorische Probleme, sowohl vor Ort zwischen den verschiedenen Truppenstellern als auch auf der Planungs- und Kommunikationsebene zwischen UN und Mitgliedstaaten und im UN-Sekretariat selbst. Wie ein späterer Bericht der UN zu den Geschehnissen in Srebrenica zeigt, flossen die Informationen zwischen dem Balkan und dem UN-Hauptquartier sehr langsam. Später zeigte sich zudem, dass die Geheimdienste Großbritanniens und der USA schon im Juni 1995 ahnten, dass Angriffe auf einige der Schutzzonen bevorstehen. Sie teilten diese Information jedoch nicht mit den Niederländern. Bereits im Frühjahr 1995 wurde im Sicherheitsrat diskutiert, dass die Truppen zu schwach seien, um die Schutzzonen zu verteidigen. Die USA befürchteten jedoch, dass die UNPROFOR ihre Positionen auch mit zusätzlichen Kräften nicht halten würden können. Der Sicherheitsrat stockte die Truppen infolgedessen nicht auf. 

Die Debatte über Srebrenica und den Krieg in Bosnien-Herzegowina floss Ende der 1990er prägend in die Diskussion über eine Reform des UNPeacekeeping sowie über die internationale Schutzverantwortung, die sogenannte Responsibility to Protect, ein. Ab 1999 begann die UN damit, den Schutz von Zivilistinnen und Zivilisten zum Kernbestandteil vieler Blauhelmmissionen zu machen. Rund 90 Prozent der seit 1999 beschlossenen neuen Peacekeeping-Missionen haben ein Mandat zum Schutz von Zivilisten. Heutige Friedensmissionen mit einem solchen Mandat haben den Auftrag, den Schutz von Zivilistinnen und Zivilisten nicht nur durch Präsenz und Dialog mit den Konfliktparteien, sondern auch durch die Beförderung eines sicheren Umfelds, etwa durch Unterstützung von Sicherheitssektorreformen, sowie durch notfalls gewaltsamen physischen Schutz sicherzustellen. Auch wenn dies aus unterschiedlichen Gründen – wie oftmals mangelnder Ausrüstung, geringer Truppenstärke und unterschiedlichen Regelauslegungen durch die truppenstellenden Staaten – häufig nicht wie beabsichtigt funktioniert, ist dies doch eine deutliche Veränderung im Vergleich zu den UN-Missionen wie einst in Bosnien-Herzegowina. 

Srebrenica ist bis heute eine Mahnung 

Srebrenica ist bis heute eine Mahnung dafür was passieren kann, wenn nicht rechtzeitig auf Warnungen vor möglichen Massenverbrechen reagiert wird. Auch heute noch sind viele der großen Gewaltkonflikte durch schwere Gewalt gegen Zivilistinnen und Zivilisten geprägt. Gesundheitseinrichtungen, werden angegriffen, ganze Dörfer zerstört, sexualisierte Gewalt wird immer wieder als Kriegstaktik angewandt. Dies zeigt nicht zuletzt die hohe Zahl an Menschen, die tagtäglich vor Krieg und Gewalt fliehen. Und auch wenn sich die UN-Blauhelmmissionen besser aufgestellt haben und effektiver geworden sind: In vielen Situationen, wie etwa in Mali, Südsudan oder der Demokratischen Republik Kongo, drohen auch heute noch Friedensmissionen an ihren Aufgaben zu scheitern. 

Gleichzeitig kommt es auch heute noch zu Verbrechen gegen die Menschlichkeit und Völkermorden in Friedenszeiten. Das jüngste Beispiel ist Myanmar. Eine Untersuchungskommission des UN-Menschenrechtsrates wirft den dortigen Behörden vor, in ihrem Vorgehen gegen mutmaßliche Terroristen ab August 2017 eine genozidäre Absicht verfolgt zu haben, d.h. das Ziel verfolgt zu haben die Rohingya-Gemeinschaft in Myanmar zu zerstören. Der UN-Sicherheitsrat reagierte jedoch nicht darauf. 

Angesichts dessen muss der 25. Jahrestag des Völkermordes in Srebrenica auch als Anlass gesehen werden, die Prioritätensetzung in der UN, aber auch in der deutschen und europäischen Außenpolitik und der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit kritisch zu prüfen. Können wir mehr tun, um Menschen vor Massenverbrechen zu schützen und können wir es nicht früher tun, bevor es überhaupt zu Gewaltausbrüchen kommt?  

Gerade in der Erinnerung an Srebrenica sollte dabei auch die personelle, materielle und finanzielle Ausstattung von UN-Friedensmissionen verbessert werden. Dort wo diese angemessen ausgestattet sind, so die einschlägige Forschung, nimmt die einseitige Gewalt gegen Zivilistinnen und Zivilisten ab und die Risiken für ein Wiederausbrechen von Gewalt nach Konflikten sinken. 

 

Autor: Gregor Hofmann