Beiträge

Simon Adams, Executive Director des Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect in New York

Interview mit Simon Adams: „mass atrocities are a developmental catastrophe“

Simon Adams, Executive Director des Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect in New York

Simon Adams, Executive Director des Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect in New York

Simon Adams ist the Executive Director of the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect in New York. He has worked extensively with civil society organizations around the world. He has published several books on international conflict and is a reknown expert on issues of mass atrocity prevention and international justice. The Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect is working for the promotion of universal acceptance and effective operational implementation of the norm of the „Responsibility to Protect“ populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. It engages in advocacy around specific crises, conducts research designed to further understanding of R2P, recommends strategies to help states build capacity, and works closely with NGOs, governments and international and regional institutions to operationalize the Responsibility to Protect. The Centre is funded by different governments, donations and individuals.

Genocide Alert has asked Simon Adams about his thoughts and recommendations on the nexus of conflict prevention, development cooperation and atrocity prevention.

Is there a difference betweenconventionaldevelopment cooperation and structural mass atrocity prevention? If there is a difference, what is it? 

Simon Adams: There is obviously an overlap but I think what is distinct is where you apply a mass atrocity prevention lens to particular forms of development cooperation. Not to be too reductive, but is digging a well just an issue of providing clean drinking water in keeping with a particular SDG? What if the well is in a village where people are divided on the basis of rival communal identities and access to water is a source of conflict? What risks are therefore associated with digging the well? Could it actually end up exacerbating tensions or reinforcing discriminatory structures? Or could a well be provided in a way that actually helps bring the community closer together and helps overcome some past sources of conflict? I actually experienced this exact situation in East Timor in 2002 but it is illustrative of a bigger issue about how we understand that development cooperation does not take place in a political, historical and social void. Context is crucial.  

In Germany, the concept of mass atrocity prevention lies in the hands of the Foreign Office foremostly. Would it make sense to include mass atrocity prevention as an explicit goal of development cooperation? 

Simon Adams: Yes. Absolutely. We know, for example, that mass atrocities are a developmental catastrophe. The war in Syria has wiped out 35 years of developmental gains in health and welfare. The genocide in Rwanda caused a 60% reduction in the economy in one year. The civil war in Syria has kept an entire generation of kids out of school and will have a drastic impact on their ability to meet SDG goals. Mass atrocity prevention should definitely be an explicit goal of development cooperation. It’s not just a matter of avoiding risks, but of consciously understanding how development can help undermine the underlying sources of identity-based conflict.  

In its guidelines on crises prevention, the German Government declared that the prevention of genocide and other grave human rights violations belongs to the German reason of state. These guidelines explicitely are of cross-ministerial nature. What can a cross-ministerial coopearation in mass atrocity prevention look like in Germany or other states 

Simon Adams: I think Denmark has made some progress in this area and some other states too. Cross-ministerial cooperation is essential. For example, I’m sure Germany’s ministries of justice, foreign affairs and development are all concerned about the situation with the Rohingya in Myanmar. It would be a disaster if future development cooperation in Rakhine State profited the people who carried out the genocide and whom the ministries of justice and foreign affairs probably think should be sanctioned or taken to the ICC.  

Do you know of any concrete cases where development cooperation might have hightened the risk of mass atrocities, for example by increasing tensions between different groups? 

Simon Adams: See my example re: East Timor above. Also, Rwanda was a major recipient of aid prior to the genocide. No one really questioned the fact that the regime openly discriminated against Tutsi. The government was also seen as a reliable and reasonably non-corrupt partner. Many western governments liked doing development work in Rwanda. And then of course 1994 happened. I think there are numerous other examples where governments who are recipients of aid divert that aid to benefit particular communities to the detriment of others.  

Do you know of any concrete cases where it is plausible to assume that development cooperation prevented onsets of mass atrocities? 

Simon Adams: Too many too list. Look at any country with identity-based divisions and with a history of violent conflict. I think development assistance has been crucial in many of these countries and not just those that have formally transitioned from active armed conflict to peace.  

What role can civil-society actors play in coordinating development cooperation and prevention of mass atrocities? 

Simon Adams: They are often not just the eyes and ears on the ground, but the mouth that can speak up about the specific ways in which particular forms of development cooperation could make a situation worse, or could radically improve it. 

 

The interview was conducted by Paul Stewens

» Zurück zur Projektseite Prävention von Massenverbrechen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit

Interview mit Alex Bellamy: „Structural atrocity prevention is about reducing atrocity risks and building resilience“

Alexander Bellamy

Alexander Bellamy

Alexander Bellamy is Director of the Asia Pacific Centre for the Responsibility to Protect and Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at The University of Queensland, Australia. He is an expert on Human protection, Peacekeeping, and the Responsibility to Protect. His research research and policy consultancy focusses on the prevention of genocide and mass atrocities and human security in the Asia Pacific region. The Asia Pacific Centre for the Responsibility to Protect is engaing with partners across the Asia Pacific-region to protect vulnerable populations and to develop regional expertise on atrocity prevention. The Centre is funded by The University of Queensland and the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Genocide Alert has asked Alex Bellamy about his thoughts and recommendations on the nexus of conflict prevention, development cooperation and atrocity prevention.

Is there a difference betweenconventionaldevelopment cooperation and structural mass atrocity prevention? If there is a difference, what is it? 

Alexander Bellamy: The goals are different. Development is focused on achieving economic growth and reducing poverty; structural atrocity prevention is about reducing atrocity risks and building resilience to those risks. Unless development planners are asking specific questions about how their work can support atrocity risk reduction and resilience building there is a good chance the work won’t get done. There is also a chance that development work can exacerbate risks (as happened in Sri Lanka for example) by unintentionally reinforcing other social divides.  

In Germany, the concept of mass atrocity prevention lies in the hands of the Foreign Office foremostly. Would it make sense to include mass atrocity prevention as an explicit goal of development cooperation? 

Alexander Bellamy: I usually talk about the injection of an ‘atrocity prevention lensinto development cooperation. This need not require an explicit atrocity prevention in development cooperationthough it would always be useful to have one. Ideally, supporting atrocity prevention would be a whole of government aspiration driven by a government’s commitment to R2P. The point of a lens is to ensure that it is someone’s job to (1) assess risks/resilience in country and sensitize foreign office/development officials to those risks /sources of resilience; (2) examine whether partnerships are contributing to risk reduction/resilience building, and how they might better achieve this; (3) ensure that partnerships do no inadvertently increase risks.  

In its guidelines on crises prevention, the German Government declared that the prevention of genocide and other grave human rights violations belongs to the German reason of state. These guidelines explicitely are of cross-ministerial nature. What can a cross-ministerial coopearation in mass atrocity prevention look like in Germany or other states 

Alexander Bellamy: every government is different in terms of how it organises itself and develops cross-ministerial policy. The US established an ‘atrocity prevention boardcomprising officials from relevant departments to share information and analysis. Others simply give their R2P focal point responsibility for coordinating across ministries. Others set up committees. The German government’s commitment goes beyond that of most other governments and creates a strong mandate for establishing some sort of whole of government mechanism. Whether that’s an individual, committee, or board, depends on what people think is the most effective way to get the job done. 

Do you know of any concrete cases where development cooperation might have hightened the risk of mass atrocities, for example by increasing tensions between different groups? 

Alexander Bellamy: Yes, Sri Lanka prior to 2009 – aid projects in Tamil run areas exacerbated tensions with local Sinhalese and created fears of an internationally backed pseudo state emerging. Another is Myanmar – the inflow of investment and aid in the context of government reform created impetus for land reclamations to allow inward investment. Demand for land in Rakhine state was one of the factors drivingclearanceoperations. It has also exacerbated Tatmadaw interest in securing access to timber and other resources in other conflict affected areas. In this context, it was significant that aid and investment did not come with strong human rights conditionality attached to it. 

Do you know of any concrete cases where it is plausible to assume that development cooperation prevented onsets of mass atrocities? 

Alexander Bellamy: When you’re talking structural risks, there is no direct connection between risk and the onset of atrocities. Societies with high risk can survive decades without ever succumbing to atrocities, for example. So we cannot  draw a direct line from structural prevention to avoidance. We can, however, look at places where risk has declined – such as Indonesia, Timor Leste, China itselfexamples of countries that have experienced risk but not atrocities, such as Tanzania, Botswana, Zambia – and also examples of countries emerging from atrocities such as Sierra Leone and Liberia – this connection between peacebuilding and atrocity prevention is an important and understudied area.  

What role can civil-society actors play in coordinating development cooperation and prevention of mass atrocities? 

Alexander Bellamy: of course their role is limited when it comes to government led cooperation, but civil society actors can play a significant role in preventing atrocities. We know for example that where countries have vibrant civil societies they are much better placed to manage moments of tension and address underlying challenges. For example, Syria collapsed in part because there was no effective civil society. Meanwhile civil society in Kenya played a crucial role in preventing election violence in 2013. The key is to understand which civil society actors are playing positive roles in-country and to work with them to see what support can be offered. This can be done directly between civil society actors. For example, we are supporting local NGOs in Timor-Leste, Indonesia, Myanmar, and Bangladesh to do things like community based early warning, counter hate speech, provide women and girls with stronger access to justice etc. There is much more that could be done in this space. 

 

The interview was conducted by Paul Stewens

» Zurück zur Projektseite Prävention von Massenverbrechen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit

25 Jahre nach dem Völkermord in Ruanda: Ist solches Versagen heute immer noch möglich?

Der Völkermord in Ruanda jährt sich in diesen Tagen zum 25. Mal. Vor einem Vierteljahrhundert ermordeten radikale Hutu in nur etwa 100 Tagen über 800.000 Tutsi, moderate Hutu und Twa. Dieser im April 1994 begonnene Völkermord war keine spontane Gewalteskalation. Er folgte einer detaillierten Vorbereitung. Ihm gingen jahrelange Warnsignale und zahlreiche Eskalationen und Angriffe voraus. Die internationale Gemeinschaft und auch Deutschland im Speziellen haben versagt, Risiken richtig zu analysieren, Warnungen zu berücksichtigen und Schritte zur Prävention zu ergreifen. Selbst als das massenhafte Morden begann, stand die Welt lange tatenlos daneben. Trotz ausgiebiger Diskussion des damaligen Versagens bleibt es fraglich, ob die Weltgemeinschaft und Deutschland heute ein “erneutes Ruanda” präventiv verhindern würden.

Beitrag von Robin Hering, Gregor Hofmann und Jens Stappenbeck

Der Ausbruch des Völkermordes

Am Abend des 06. April 1994 wurde die Maschine des ruandischen Präsidenten Habyarimana im Landeanflug auf Kigali abgeschossen. Innerhalb von Minuten nach dem Abschuss griffen radikale Hutus systematisch und gezielt Tutsis und weitere Zivilisten an, die als gemäßigt oder Tutsi-Unterstützer betrachtet wurden. Die Interahamwe Miliz, unterstützt u.a. durch das ruandische Militär, den Propaganda-Radiosender RTLM, aber auch durch einfache Bürger, machte gezielt Jagd. Die Täter gingen koordiniert vor. Sie nutzten vorbereitete Namens- und Adresslisten, zogen von Haus zu Haus und errichteten Straßensperren, an denen die Opfer auf brutale Weise und in aller Öffentlichkeit getötet wurden. Im ganzen Land wurden mit einfachen Waffen und Macheten in nur etwa drei Monaten über 800.000 Menschen ermordet.

Versagen bei der Früherkennung und Prävention des Völkermordes

Trotz des vermeintlichen klaren Auslösers – dem Abschuss der Präsidentenmaschine -, war der Völkermord kein spontanes Ereignis. Aus heutiger Sicht gab es im Vorfeld zahlreiche Hinweise, an denen eine effektive Früherkennung und Prävention hätte ansetzen können. Spannungen zwischen den verschiedenen Gruppen reichten bereits Jahrzehnte zurück. Zum Teil hatten sie bereits ihren Ursprung in der deutsch-belgischen Kolonialherrschaft. In den Jahren vor 1994 war eine zunehmende Polarisierung erkennbar und es gab bereits Pogrome und Massaker. Die detaillierte Vorbereitung des Massenmordes belegen die Erstellung von Tutsi-Namens bzw. Tötungslisten, die Existenz von Ausbildungslagern für radikale Hutu-Milizen oder eine Verdopplung der Machetenimporte nach Ruanda. Auch öffentliche Hassreden und zahlreiche ignorierte Hinweise von lokalen Politikern und Militärs an die UN-Mission vor Ort unterstreichen die genaue Planung. Spätestens ab Herbst 1993 erreichten die Warnungen auch das vor Ort engagierte Deutschland, fanden allerdings kein Gehör.

Die International Gemeinschaft war u.a. durch die in Ruanda stationierte UN-Mission UNAMIR vor Ort. Die Mission sollte ein in 1993 geschlossenes Friedensabkommen zwischen der Hutu-dominierten Regierung und der oppositionellen Tutsi-geprägten Ruandischen Patriotischen Front (RPF) überwachen. Das Mandat der Blauhelme erlaubte jedoch kein militärisches Eingreifen. Im Vorfeld des Völkermords berichtete UNAMIR-Kommandant Roméo Dallaire, basierend auf zahlreichen Meldungen und einem hochrangigen lokalen Informanten, über Vorbereitungen für einen möglichen Völkermord an die UN-Zentrale in New York. Der UN-Sicherheitsrat beschäftigte sich jedoch nicht mit diesen Hinweisen. Der dringende Appell Dallaires, vom Informanten genannte Waffenlager sofort zu untersuchen und die Waffen zu konfiszieren bevor sie von den Hutu-Milizen eingesetzt werden würden, wurde abgelehnt.

Die Rolle Deutschlands

Auch die Bundesregierung ignorierte die Warnsignale. Dabei war die die Bundesrepublik in Ruanda sehr präsent und pflegte diverse Kontakte: Die Gesellschaft für technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ; heute GIZ) war im Land aktiv, Rheinland-Pfalz pflegte eine Länderpartnerschaft und auch deutsche politische Stiftungen waren präsent. Deutschland war so aktiv, dass es in 1993 – dem Jahr vor dem Völkermord – zum größten Geber des Landes für Entwicklungshilfe aufstieg. Seit 1978 beriet die Bundeswehr bei der Ausbildung des ruandischen Militärs und bildete einige spätere génocidaires an der Hamburger Führungsakademie aus. Angesichts dieser langjährigen Beziehungen zwischen Deutschland und Ruanda, hätte die Bundesregierung über das sich anbahnende Grauen informiert sein können.

Deutsche Berater berichteten bereits im Sommer 1993 über die sich abzeichnenden Ereignisse und die Mobilisierung der Interahamwe. Die Berichte verschwanden jedoch in den bürokratischen Abläufen des Verteidigungs- und des Entwicklungsministeriums in Bonn. Die deutsche Botschaft tat den Bericht eines Oberst der Bundeswehr-Beratergruppe über Trainingslager für Hutu-Milizen und drohende Massaker als Panikmache ab und leitete diese nicht an die Berliner Zentrale weiter. Im Vorfeld des Völkermords nutzten ruandische Soldaten den Fuhrpark eines GTZ-Projektes, um Waffen zu verteilen und die Interahamwe-Milizen auszurüsten. Ein GTZ-Mitarbeiter ließ sich versetzen, da er die Situation nicht verantworten könne. Noch im September 1993 vertrat die deutsche Botschaft die Ansicht, die Habyarimana-Regierung arbeite daran, die Menschenrechtslage zu verbessern.

Versagen bei der Reaktion auf den Völkermord

Im Angesicht des Völkermordes hätte der UN-Sicherheitsrat den Forderungen Romeo Daillaires nach mehr Truppen und einem aktiven Mandat folgen können, um die öffentlichen massiven Gewalttaten und Massaker zu unterbinden. Stattdessen reduzierte der UN-Sicherheitsrat nach Ausbruch des Völkermordes die Truppenstärke von UNAMIR von 2.500 auf 270 Mann. Freiwillig blieben 450 Blauhelme in der Hauptstadt Kigali, um wenigstens einige Menschen zu retten. Ein robustes Mandat, mit welchem Sie Waffengewalt zum Schutz von Zivilisten hätten einsetzen können, blieb ihnen allerdings verwehrt.

Während der Völkermord bereits stattfand, wurde in Deutschland und auch in anderen Staaten lange nicht von einem Genozid gesprochen. Medien und Politik beschrieben die Situation als einen Bürgerkrieg, den man von außen nicht beeinflussen könne. Auch ein Staatsminister im Auswärtigen Amt erklärte, “dass Appelle in einer Situation, in der im Busch gekämpft wird, nur sehr schwer vermittelbar sind.” Praktische Hilfe wurde versagt: Eine konkrete Anfrage der Vereinten Nationen nach 100 Sanitätssoldaten und einem Transportflugzeug lehnte die Regierung Kohl mit Verweis auf die Sicherheitslage vor Ort ab. Im Bundestag gab es während der drei Monate des Völkermordes keine eigene Debatte dazu. Auch Bundeskanzler Helmut Kohl äußerte sich nur ein einziges Mal: Als er begrüßte, dass alle Deutschen erfolgreich aus dem Land evakuiert wurden.

Erst am 17. Mai 1994 beschloss der UN-Sicherheitsrat, UNAMIR wieder auf 5.500 Mann aufzustocken und das Mandat zu erweitern. Er erlaubte jedoch weiterhin keinen Gewalteinsatz zum Schutz von Zivilisten. Die Truppen, die einige afrikanische Staaten zugesagt hatten, besaßen zudem keine ausreichende Ausrüstung. Staaten im Westen wollten selbst kaum Ausrüstung und Soldaten stellen, auch deren Finanzierung sagten sie nicht zu. Die Bundesregierung stellte damals klar, „deutsche Soldaten [würden] auf keinen Fall nach Ruanda geschickt.“ Lediglich deutsche Staatsbürger wurden ausgeflogen. Ende Juni errichtete Frankreich eine sogenannte “humanitäre Sicherheitszone” im Südwesten Ruandas. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war der Völkermord allerdings bereits durch die Machtübernahme der RPF so gut wie beendet.

Aufarbeitung und Lehren aus dem Völkermord

Rückblickend beschrieben zahlreiche Überlebende, Zeugen und Wissenschaftler das Versagen der Internationalen Gemeinschaft. Doch welche Lehren wurden auf politischer Ebene aus dem damaligen Scheitern gezogen? In der Tat wurden in den vergangenen 25 Jahren zahlreiche Dinge verändert. Aufbauend auf dem sogenannten “Brahimi-Report” ist beispielsweise der Schutz von Zivilisten mittlerweile fundamentaler Bestandteil von UN-Blauhelmmandaten. Während es zur juristischen Aufarbeitung des ruandischen Völkermords noch eines internationalen ad-hoc Gericht bedurfte, nahm 2002 der permanente Internationale Strafgerichtshof seine Arbeit auf. Auch rückte die Früherkennung von Massenverbrechen wie Völkermorden stärker in den Fokus. Unter anderem als Reaktion auf Ruanda und den ein Jahr später verübten Völkermord in Srebrenica, wurde außerdem das Konzept der Schutzverantwortung (englisch: Responsibility to Protect, R2P) entwickelt. Auf dem UN-Weltgipfel 2005 wurde das Konzept von sämtlichen Staaten angenommen. Damit bekannten sich alle Staaten zur Verantwortung, ihre eigene Bevölkerung vor Massenverbrechen zu schützen. Außerdem vereinbarten sie, sich gegenseitig bei der Wahrnehmung ihrer Verantwortung zu unterstützen. Für den Fall, dass ein Staat nicht fähig oder willens ist seiner Schutzverantwortung nachzukommen, erklärten sie,  dass die Staatengemeinschaft eine Verantwortung zur Reaktion habe. Besonders der UN-Sicherheitsrat steht dann in der Pflicht und kann hierfür auch Zwangsmaßnahmen beschließen.

Trotz dieser Veränderungen ist es fragwürdig, ob Deutschland und die internationale Gemeinschaft heute ein “erneutes Ruanda” verhindern oder unterbinden würden. In der Praxis fehlt es in konkreten Fällen oftmals am Willen und politischer Einigkeit. Es fehlt aber auch insbesondere in Deutschland an einer Institutionalisierung der Krisenfrüherkennung, die schon in Ruanda hätte effektiver funktionieren können und müssen. Eine konkrete Aufarbeitung des deutschen Versagens bei der Prävention des Völkermordes in Ruanda wurde jüngst erneut im Bundestag vorgeschlagen, aber nie durchgeführt.

Der UN-Sicherheitsrat ist unterdessen in vielen aktuellen Situationen von Massenverbrechen blockiert oder unwillig zu handeln. In Syrien werden seit acht Jahren durch die Regierung und andere Kriegsparteien schwerste Kriegs- und Menschenrechtsverbrechen begangen. In Myanmar führte das Militär kürzlich ethnische Säuberungen gegen bis zu einer Millionen muslimischer Rohingya durch. Im Südsudan und im Jemen kosten blutige Bürgerkriege Hunderttausenden das Leben. In all diesen Fällen hat es die internationale Gemeinschaft nicht vermocht, Massenverbrechen zu verhindern.

Strategie notwendig

Der UN-Untergeneralsekretär und Sonderberater für die Verhütung von Völkermord, Adama Dieng, unterstützt daher die Etablierung von nationalen Mechanismen zur Früherkennung und Prävention von Massenverbrechen. Im Januar 2019 riefen Adama Dieng und der Geschäftsführer von Genocide Alert, Jens Stappenbeck, im Bundestag-Unterausschuss “Zivile Krisenprävention, Konfliktprävention und Vernetztes Handeln” zur Erstellung eines ressortübergreifenden Bestandsberichts auf. Dieser sollte in allen relevanten Ministerien die Kapazitäten zur Prävention von Massenverbrechen sowie Optimierungspotenziale erfassen und zu einem nationalen Präventionsmechanismus führen. Eine solche Bestandsaufnahme ist wichtig, um in Zukunft im Angesicht drohender Massenverbrechen die verfügbaren außenpolitischen Instrumente, eingebettet in eine fundierte Strategie, zielgerichtet zur Anwendung bringen zu können.

Deutschland und die Welt dürfen nie wieder so hilflos daneben stehen wie damals in Ruanda. Es liegt an der Politik und dem Regierungsapparat die notwendigen Schritte zu ergreifen und eine Strategie zu entwickeln, damit auf Frühwarnung auch eine frühzeitige Reaktion folgt. Doch auch die Medien, die Zivilgesellschaft und die Öffentlichkeit müssen diesem Thema die notwendige Aufmerksamkeit schenken und immer wieder fragen: Tun wir genug, damit sich solch schreckliche Verbrechen nie mehr wiederholen?

Autoren: Robin Hering, Gregor Hofmann und Jens Stappenbeck (Genocide Alert)


Genocide Alert hat 2014 im Rahmen des Projektes “20 Jahre nach Ruanda” zahlreiche Interviews und Podiumsdiskussionen sowie einen Essaywettbewerb durchgeführt, um an den Völkermord 1994 zu erinnern und Lehren für die heutige Politik zu ziehen. Das Projekt wurde von der Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung gefördert. Die Ergebnisse sind auf einer Projektseite dokumentiert:

» 20 Jahre nach dem Völkermord in Ruanda: Was haben wir gelernt?

 


Als Teil des Projektes erstellte Genocide Alert e.V. zudem einen Twitter-Account namens @Ruanda1994, der die Geschehnisse vor und während des Völkermordes “live” 20 Jahre später wiedergab.

» Ruanda-Timeline ’94 (Twitter)

 

„Nie wieder“? Ein Handlungsleitfaden für Parlamentarier zur Prävention von Massenverbrechen

Fast 2/3 aller Flüchtlinge weltweit stammen aus nur 12 von Massenverbrechen betroffenen oder bedrohten Staaten. Allein in zehn ihrer Herkunftsstaaten wurden im Jahr 2017 über 147.000 Menschen getötet, darunter über 28.400 Zivilisten. Obwohl sich nur eine sehr kleine Minderheit der Flüchtlinge in Deutschland aufhält, löste ihr Ankunft eine der intensivsten Debatten um Flüchtlinge und Fluchtursachen in der Geschichte der Bundesrepublik aus. Gefühlter Kontrollverlust und diffuse Ängste haben aber auch zum Aufschwung von Rechtspopulisten beigetragen, die für nationale Abschottung und einen Rückzug aus internationalem Engagement plädieren. Angesichts anhaltender Notstände und zahlreicher Krisensituationen wäre dies nicht nur moralisch, wirtschafts- und sicherheitspolitisch verantwortungslos, sondern auch aufgrund der Mobilität von Flüchtlingen nicht durchsetzbar.

Das Verhindern von Massenverbrechen, d.h. von Völkermorden, Verbrechen gegen die Menschlichkeit und systematischen Kriegsverbrechen, stellt eine moralische und historische Verantwortung Deutschlands dar und liegt im Hinblick auf ihre katastrophalen wirtschafts- und sicherheitspolitischen Auswirkungen im ureigenen Interesse der Bundesrepublik. Die Bundesregierung hat das Verhindern von Massenverbrechen im Juni 2017 in den Leitlinien zur Krisenprävention entsprechend zur deutschen Staatsraison erklärt.

 

Download Policy Paper

 

Um die Staatsraison in praktische Schritte zu übersetzen und Massenverbrechen tatsächlich effektiver zu verhindern, ist eine außenpolitische Schwerpunktsetzung und Konzeptentwicklung in der Prävention von Massenverbrechen notwendig. Wie dieses Policy Paper illustriert, besitzt die Bundesrepublik einen Blinden Fleck bei der frühzeitigen Erkennung und der gezielten Prävention von Massenverbrechen. Zur Behebung ist die Erstellung eines Bestandsberichtes zur Prävention von Massenverbrechen erforderlich, der von Parlamentariern angestoßen und vom Auswärtigen Amt in Auftrag gegeben werden sollte.

Das frühzeitige Verhindern der schwersten Menschenrechtverletzungen weltweit darf kein politisches Randthema bleiben. Die Möglichkeiten parlamentarischen Engagements gehen weit über den Anstoß eines Bestandsberichtes hinaus. Zugeschnitten auf spezifische Ausschüsse und Tätigkeitsfelder entwirft dieses Paper anhand von 27 konkreten Handlungsvorschlägen eine Strategie zur Prävention von Massenverbrechen. Es basiert auf Ergebnissen eines mit dem Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation durchgeführten Parlamentarierprojektes sowie dem Global Parliamentarians – Treffen zu Atrocity Prevention.

 

Weiterlesen:

GA Policy Paper – Handlungsleitfaden für Parlamentarier zur Prävention von Massenverbrechen

Koalitionsvertrag offenbart Handlungsbedarf bei der Prävention von Massenverbrechen

Die neue Bundesregierung wurde am 14. März vereidigt. Als Grundlage der zukünftigen Regierungsgeschäfte enthält der Koalitionsvertrag in Bezug auf die Schutzverantwortung einige sehr begrüßenswerte Forderungen, etwa nach einer restriktiveren Rüstungsexportpolitik. In vielen Punkten geht er jedoch nicht weit genug.
Weiterlesen

Ein niedergebranntes Haus in einem Rohingya-Dorf im nördlichen Rakhine State, August 2017 (Wikimedia/Moe Zaw (VOA))

Die Notlage der Rohingya und die Verantwortung, ethnische Säuberungen zu verhindern

Die Gewalt gegen die Rohingya in Myanmar und deren erzwungene Vertreibung hält weiter an. Obwohl die dortigen Geschehnisse als ethnische Säuberungen bezeichnen werden können, zeigt sich der UN-Sicherheitsrat unfähig, die Gewalt entsprechend zu verurteilen. Das wirft die Frage auf, was die ‚Responsibility to Protect’ in der Praxis bedeutet. Die anhaltende humanitäre Krise ist Resultat und Höhepunkt bereits lange Zeit andauernder Diskriminierung der Rohingyas. Diese muslimischen Minderheit aus dem Staat Rakhine wird weiter leiden und noch mehr Gräueltaten ausgesetzt sein, wenn die internationale Gemeinschaft weiterhin nichts unternimmt.

Weiterlesen